Informal prompt: Amount v. number

Today I have an informal writing prompt based on a published source for you to use with teens or adults. Here’s the published sentence that you show and read to students:

The New York Fed suggests, as one might imagine, these trends are related to the fact that many industries that have been hit the hardest — hospitality and retail, for instance — employ a higher amount low-wage workers, while high-wage workers often have more flexibility in their jobs and can work remotely.

Here are the directions you give students:

In no more than two sentences, identify the error or errors you see in that published sentence and explain how you’d correct the error or errors. You have 30 seconds to write.

Turn responses into a mini vocabulary lesson

Tell students, “There are actually two errors in that sentence. The one that’s easiest to spot is the missing word of. The other mistake is a wrong word. Amount is a term that applies to items that are not countable. For example, you can have an amount of trash, but you can’t have 19,592 trashes. Workers are countable. Someone can find out how many workers there are by counting them: one, two, three, four, etc. The term used to refer to countable items is number.

“To show that you understand the difference between when to use the word amount and when to use the word number, write one sentence on any topic other than employment figures in which you use both amount and number correctly. If you want to use your creativity to present a profound truth or to make people laugh, you may do that. You have one minute to write.”

Put informal prompts to work every class period

Informal prompts as brief as this used at least daily, give students practice in focusing their thoughts and writing quickly. The responses don’t need to be graded, though you should skim them to see how well you’re getting your points across. I recommend that you respond in writing once a month to something each student turned in, just so students know you’re paying attention. One short, specific sentence will be enough.

The source of the quoted sentence is Tim O’Donnell, “High-wage workers are getting all the jobs.” February 9, 2021 in The Week’s Speed Reads.

© 2021 Linda G. Aragoni