What’s the cost of a 3-month Chancellor?

Cathleen “Cathie” Black is gone from her post as New York City’s school Chancellor, but one state Senator wants to know how much Ms. Black’s three-month tenure cost taxpayers.

According to the  April 25 Legislative Gazette [dead link removed],  Sen. Ruben Diaz has filed a Freedom on Information request to discover “the entire salary, benefits, and other compensation that New York City Schools Chancellor Cathie Black has received or will receive, including any severance or retirement benefits.”

Black came from a publishing background with no experience in education. The City had to request a waiver from the State for her to head the city schools.  State Education Commissioner David Steiner granted the waiver for Black over the objections of a screening panel.

After Black resigned, she was replaced by Dennis Wolcott, a former deputy mayor, who also lacked certification as a school administrator. He was granted a waiver with the approval of the screening panel that objected to Black.

My reporter’s instincts say the FIOL request is just a publicity ploy: The real story here is whether it is important for someone who oversees a school system with over a million students to have experience in educational administration. What do you say?

[link removed 2016-02-03]

Advice for NYC’s new Chancellor, Dennis Walcott

Pedro Noguera has begun a conversation “Support And Advice For Chancellor Dennis Walcott” on the City Limits website.

Noguera writes:

“New York’s public schools don’t need a savior or a superman. We need a leader with the maturity and vision to draw on the talent and resources in this city.”

He offers seven specific suggestionsto the new schools Chancellor, which he delivers in refreshingly polite terms.

[2016-02-03 repaired broken link]