Real writing is necessary writing

In 2020, real writing doesn’t mean an essayist at Walden Pond, or a poet in an attic, or a novelist in a retreat in the Berkshires.

https://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/walden-site-of-thoreaus-hut.jpg
1908 photo of the site of the cottage near Walden Pond in which Henry David Thoreau lived 1845-1847.

Real writing is necessary writing. It’s everyday, nonfiction writing. It’s not “lovely,” or “powerful,” or “gut-wrenching.” It’s ordinary, routine, mostly dull, and mostly unmemorable.

Real writing answers real people’s questions:

  • Why did your daughter miss school Wednesday?
  • Where can I buy 3 dozen rolls of toilet paper?
  • How many days will we need a dump truck when we gut the Jericho Inn?

Real writing is writing before it’s been scribbled out, worked over, and revised for a fourth time.

Real writing is what the customer service representative types in the chat window. Real writing is fast writing. It’s adequate, competent, good enough.

The aim of real writing is first drafts that say clearly everything that needs to be said in no more words than are absolutely necessary. And real writing aims at clean first drafts, free from mistakes that either force people to reread sentences twice to figure out their meaning or that make people laugh out loud.

Real writing is what is expected from writing teachers.

Real writing is what teachers are expected to teach their students to do.

Real writing is what every high school graduate should be able to do.

© 2020 Linda G. Aragoni

Are your high school grads college-ready?

Twenty years ago, the foremost issue in the mind of a person asking if high school graduates were ready for college would have been students’ academic preparation: Could the high school graduates learn, read, write, and compute at the level required by degree-granting institutions?

two adult male students of different ages
Concentration is essential at any age.

Today there’s a different question that K-12 educators rarely mention: Will your students be able to compete in classes with men and women 10 or more years older than they are?

Today’s reality: The headline says it all

A news story about the shifting demographics of higher education captured the new reality: “27 is the new 18.”

Adult learners, a.k.a. “nontraditional learners,” make up 35 percent of college students today. Their numbers are growing faster than the numbers of traditional college students.

The traditional college student who arrives at age 18 and leaves at 22 for his first full-time job is fast becoming an oddity on campuses.

The incoming first year student is more likely to be 27 than 18.

The proportion of college students over age 25 is expected to rise to about 50 percent within five years, according to the National Center for Education Statistics  Projection of Education Statistics to 2014 (September 2016).

Of those adult learners in college in 2024, 5.5 million are expected to be between 25 and 34, while another 3.9 million are expected to be over 35.

Those adult learners come with life experiences that 18-year-old high school graduates know almost nothing about:

  • a decade or more of paid employment,
  • handling their own finances,
  • paying taxes,
  • making health care decisions,
  • maintaining a home,
  • keeping a vehicle operational,
  • raising children.

What the projections mean to your students

Think of those enrollment projections this way:  The 15-year-old student who enters ninth grade in the 2019-2020 school year, graduates on time, and enters college in the fall of 2024, is likely to discover seven out of 10 of her classmates are already older than she will be when she gets her degree four years later.

The situation of the 15-year-old who enters ninth grade in the 2019-2020 school year, takes concurrent college courses on her high school campus, and enters college as a junior in the fall of 2024, will be even more intimidating.

Her classmates may well be her parents’ age.

The value of “life” learning is increasing

As the college population becomes increasingly dominated by older adults, the value of traditional high school activities such as sports and honor society will dwindle. The value of knowing how the world works—having “life” experiences rather than extracurricular ones—will increase.

When the majority of students are the professor’s age with life experiences similar to the professor’s, instruction is going to be geared to that majority.

Students who have spent their lives surrounded by others of their ages could find themselves being regarded as a kid, competing with grownups for attention and for top grades.

That could be a decidedly unpleasant experience.

It’s time for teachers, administrators, and school boards to give some thought to how they can prepare high school graduates  to compete in a classroom dominated by people who look more like their parents than they do like their friends.

Is college worth its cost?

The value of college in light of its ever-increasing costs is a hotly debated topic these days.

A blog post at InVisionApp.com on the topic of the monetary value of a higher ed degree caught my eye.

InVision, which describes itself as “a prototyping, collaboration & workflow platform,”  commissioned a research  study to find out, among other things the role education—both formal and informal—plays for designers today.  Researchers surveyed 1,650 designers from 65 countries:

The biggest takeaway we uncovered? Designers are split nearly 50/50 in terms of being self-taught and having a formal design background. 51% have a formal design education while 49% are self-taught. Makes sense when you consider the pace at which the design industry is evolving!

The study revealed having a higher education degree gave a salary advantage to the person with a degree:

As it turns out, salaried designers with formal training earn about 5% more on average than their self-taught counterparts: $78,061 compared to $74,657 annually.

That salary figure for those with formal training appears to lump all those with formal training together, whether they had an associate degree or doctorate.

bar chart of relative salaries of designers with different education levelsThe survey also revealed that the designers without formal post-secondary education skewed heavily male:

Women are more likely than men to have a higher degree, with about 72% of women holding a bachelor’s versus 56% of men. 22% of male designers hold no advanced degree, compared to just 7% of female designers.

Although all sorts of conclusions can be drawn from the InVision data, I’m struck by the potential for good paying jobs in design potentially available for the male high school students who absolutely, positively do not want to go to college.

They may not make as much over their careers as the folks with the bachelors’ and masters’ degrees, but neither do they have those bachelors’ and masters’ degree debts.

It might be worthwhile for high school teachers and guidance counselors to look at design and other fields in which kids with few resources but a keen interest can develop in-demand skills without going to college.


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